‘Women Forward NYC’ Can’t Succeed While the Mayor Cuts Child Care

Rebecca Bailin

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There is no equality without affordable child care. Yet despite claiming to stand up for women, since entering office, the mayor has made cut after cut to pre-K and 3-K — programs that have been proven to help women enter the workplace and thrive.

(Violet Mendelsund/Mayoral Photography Office) Mayor Adams details ‘Women Forward NYC’ initiative on Jan. 25 at City Hall.

This week, the mayor announced a plan to help women thrive in New York City through a series of new programs and initiatives. Unfortunately, the mayor’s latest investments in gender equity are one step forward after ten steps back. In the past six months alone the mayor has announced over $170 million in cuts to pre-K and 3-K — two critical services  that keep women in the workforce, improve gender equity, and help build our city’s economic power.

There is no equality without affordable child care. Yet despite claiming to stand up for women, since entering office, the mayor has made cut after cut to pre-K and 3-K — programs that have been proven to help women enter the workplace and thrive.

Right now, mothers still take on the lion’s share of child care responsibilities, contributing more than seven hours per day to child care, while fathers take on less than five. It is no surprise then that women are four times more likely to miss work because of child care than men. When child care is available, the situation changes completely: maternal employment increases.

I co-founded New Yorkers United for Child Care in November to bring together families who are alarmed by the cuts to our city’s universal pre-K and 3-K systems and understand the value of free child care for all kids under five.

Since launching just months ago, we have collected over 1,000 petition signatures and stories from New Yorkers, predominantly women, who have shared how barriers to child care have impeded them from taking better job offers, advancing in their careers, and realizing their dreams.

A mom from Brooklyn wrote, “I have had to turn down more lucrative work endeavors because I need to be home more.”  Another wrote in, “I am currently scaled back from work in order to provide after-school and infant care for my two children. Previously I was full time.”

One statement from women resonated again and again throughout the surveys: “I had to quit my job because we couldn’t afford daycare.”



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By Rebecca Bailin , citylimits.org , CITY VIEWS: OPINIONS and ANALYSIS,Labor,3-k,child care,gender discrimination,pre-k,universal childcare,Welfare,workforce,Workforce and Labor ,

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2024-01-25 21:50:50 , City Limits , ‘Women Forward NYC’ Can’t Succeed While the Mayor Cuts Child Care

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